Welcome to this month's State of the Blog, where I share my goals for this blog, what I'm doing to reach them, and what's working (or not working).

March 2016 State of the blog report: Want a behind-the-scenes glance at what's working/not working for my blog? Take a look to learn about my blogging goals and what I'm doing to reach them >>>>>

This post includes affiliate links (marked with an asterisk). When you use the link to make a purchase, I make a small commission at no extra cost to you. I will only share affiliate links if I have used and recommend the product or service. If you have any questions, please contact me. Thanks for your support!

New to my blog? Start here: State of the Blog for January 2016, State of the Blog for February 2016.

February 2016 Numbers

Keep in mind that traffic and social media numbers aren't everything -- I'd rather ten writer friends over 1,000 stop-an-go site visitors, wouldn't you? -- but numbers can help you get big picture insights and help you make changes.

Site Traffic and Top Content

Here's a comparison of my site traffic February 1st through 29th, 2016 (top) and January 1st through 31st, 2016 (bottom).

Psst: Learn how to find these stats in Google Analytics: I walk through the process step-by-step in the Build a Better Blog Challenge.

March 2016 State of the blog report: Want a behind-the-scenes glance at what's working/not working for my blog? Take a look to learn about my blogging goals and what I'm doing to reach them >>>>>

And a comparison of my top content February 1st through 29th, 2016 (left) and January 1st through 31st, 2016 (right).

March 2016 State of the blog report: Want a behind-the-scenes glance at what's working/not working for my blog? Take a look to learn about my blogging goals and what I'm doing to reach them >>>>>

What's important:
  • Although my traffic dropped (not surprising after last month's green smoothie surge), my bounce rate decreased and my percentage of returning visitors increased. What that means: People are coming back to my blog, and they are staying longer. Yesss! This is very helpful to me, because it means readers are getting value out of my content.

  • Also of note: My writing-related posts are still doing better than the majority of my recipe and food-related posts. Which means my transition from food(ish) blog to writing blog is going well.

Social Media Referrals

March 2016 State of the blog report: Want a behind-the-scenes glance at what's working/not working for my blog? Take a look to learn about my blogging goals and what I'm doing to reach them >>>>>

Pinterest is my number one social media network referral (I talk more about how to use it strategically in my free Build a Better Blog Challenge), but this month I was more active on Twitter and saw a jump in traffic from Twitter. More on that in a moment.

Pinterest

As I mentioned last month, Pinterest is a huge traffic driver for me. I have blog posts about how to use Pinterest more strategically in the works, but I'll also be sharing a free online workshop to show you how I use Pinterest and BoardBooster together. There will be blog posts announcing the workshop, and you can sign up here to be the first to hear about it!

Social Media Growth

One of my goals last month was to get more strategic about how I use Twitter, and it definitely paid off. That, and I entered a writing contest called Pitch Madness. Most of the interaction is on Twitter, which helped me connect with a number of new followers.

Mailing List Growth

Guys, my email list is exploding. Like, fairy dust and rainbows exploding. I am so, so excited about the number of people who are opting in to join my list! Not only is the number growing, but I'm also seeing new subscribers who want to interact with me -- asking questions and reaching out to say hello. My email friends are the best!

  • Subscribers: 353 (+194)

As I mentioned last week, I'm putting together an e-course for writers and authors who want to start (or grow) their mailing list. Sign up to be notified when it launches!

How I did on my January goals

1. Experiment with Twitter

Excellent!

My Twitter following increased quite a bit, but more importantly I'm connecting and interacting with more and more writers. Four things that worked really well:

  1. Scheduling tweets in advance

  2. Sharing more writing-related information (and mentioning the source)

  3. Joining a Twitter chat

  4. Engaging and interacting with people

I'll have more about Twitter strategy soon, but I do want to point out that much of my traffic came from being active in the #PitchMadness conversations on Twitter. It's been an excellent way to make new writer friends!

2. Work on new email course for writers and authors

Excellent!

I don't want to spoil the awesomeness ... so for now just know that this course is going to be packed full of AMAZING information. If you're a writer who wants to learn how to create and grow your mailing list, then you'll love it. :)

Psst: Sign up to be notified when this course launches.

3. Finish design tasks

#Fail

I didn't make progress on my design tasks last month. My other writing and blogging projects took priority, and I'm not bothered in the slightest. Design can wait, content comes first.

Goals for March 2016

1. Update my Build a Better Blog e-course

I have a number of new lessons to add, and I want to get them added to the course site this month.

2. Make progress on my new email course for writers and authors

There's a lot of content to write and tutorials to record - I'll be busy!

Psst: Sign up to be notified when this course launches.

3. Teach Pinterest strategy workshop

This will be such an awesome workshop! A number of you have asked me about how I use Pinterest, and I can't wait to show you exactly how I've grown my following and made Pinterest my biggest source of traffic from a social media network. Get excited. :) Sign up here!


Thank you for reading! If there's anything I mentioned that you would like to learn about, please jump in the comments to let me know.

Now I would love to hear from you:

Do you have plans for your blog this month? Tell me about it in the comments, and be sure to link to your blog so I can take a look! :)


Pitch Madness is a contest started by Brenda Drake to help querying writers find agents (learn more about Pitch Madness). If you entered the contest last Friday, then this post is for you!

Join the Unofficial Pitch Madness Blog Hop to connect with the 2016 Pitch Madness participants! Head to www.bridgidgallagher.com to get started >>>

One of the Pitch Madness participants, Eric Rasmussen, suggested a blog hop of sorts to help the Pitch Madness participants connect, and I volunteered to get it started. Please note that this is not an "official" blog hop run by the contest organizers. The hub for contest-related conversations is on Twitter under #PitchMadness. This blog hop is 100% optional, and hopefully it will give us one more way to connect and get to know each other.

How to participate

Jump in the comments and share the following:

  • Your name

  • The genre of your Pitch Madness entry

  • A link to your blog

  • Optional: Are you looking for critique partners, beta readers, or ... ? This is a great chance to connect!

Bonus blog post topic

Want to take it a step further? Write a blog post and share more about yourself and your manuscript. Link to the post in the comments.

Snag the image

Feel free to use the image I've created in this blog post, just link back to this post to help others find it and participate.

Okay, friends. I'll write the first comment to give you an example. Then feel free to add your own comment. I look forward to "meeting" you!


Last month I experimented with a few different approaches to help increase my writing productivity, and during the process discovered I could free up far more writing time by making a few simple changes. Want to do the same? Keep reading!

9 Ways to Be a More Productive Writer: Tired of feeling overwhelmed, burned out, and short on time? Today I'm sharing 9 ways to clear distractions so you can focus on your writing goals and get more done. Read the tips on my blog >>>

You know that feeling when you know you could be getting more done, but you just can't focus? Or you look up from your device and realize you have no idea how long you spent scouring Twitter or Facebook?

Eek. Who's been there?

Time is absolutely precious, especially to writers. We all want to write more, but are often juggling writing and platform-building with family, health, and day jobs. How do you do it? How do you juggle it all and still have time to get into the writing zone?

How do you juggle it all and still have time to get into the writing zone?

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First, let me say that I've been there, my friend! At the end of the year my creative well was running on empty. I was frustrated by my lack of progress on my manuscript, but couldn't figure out how to give myself the distraction-free quiet I needed to focus and get things done. Part of my struggle was that I wanted to have time to both blog and write books, but I already felt as though there were too few hours in the day.

After some reflection, I realized that I had to make better use of my time if I wanted to reach my writing and blogging goals.

So I decided to use the month to experiment with a digital detox of sorts. My goal was to free up more time for writing without cutting into the time I spend with my family or taking care of my health. I also wanted to finally take the time to track exactly how I spend my time. I've heard other writers recommend time-tracking, but I never took the time to do it.

Friends, my experiment paid off. Big time.

I met both my writing and blogging goals, without seeing a big drop in my site traffic or social media accounts. More importantly, I felt better. I found it easier to focus, and I had more energy for doing non work-related tasks. I ended the month with a feeling of confidence. Even though I got a lot done, I felt full of creative energy and enthusiasm.

Feeling overwhelmed by your writing goals? Here are 9 Ways to Be a More Productive Writer

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Today I'm sharing the biggest takeaways from my January experiment because I want you to be able to have that same refreshed, energized feeling. Take a look at the list below. You don't have to do it all right now, you can pick and choose which item to try, or you can use my results to craft your own digital detox.

Are you ready to learn how to streamline your life and focus on what you want to accomplish?

(I'll pretend you're saying, "Yes!")

Let's go.

9 Ways to Be a More Productive Writer

1. Start with purpose.

Write down your goal -- for the week, the month, the day -- and use it as your touchstone. When your mind starts to wander, return to your purpose. Why are you here? Why is this important to you? Why do you want to make more time for writing? After you write down your goal, jot down how you want to feel at the end of the day/week/month. Use that feeling to help you visualize your end point.

This might sound out there or too fuzzy for you, but visualization can be a powerful part of goal setting. For me, I started January with the goal of taking a social media hiatus and finishing my current round of revisions. I wanted to feel less pressed for time, and less scatter-brained. I wanted to feel full of creative energy. By clarifying my goals, I found it far easier to stay on task when things got hard.

2. Make a dedicated workspace.

Create a writing space where you can focus, a place to help send your brain the message that it's time to get to work. An office or room with a door is ideal, but any space that helps you focus and clear distractions works. As long as it's your official writing space, it can look like whatever you want. Avoid choosing a space where you relax or unwind (like your bed or the couch). The goal is to train your mind to know it should be in work mode when you're in your workspace.

Train your mind to know it should be in work mode when you're in your workspace.

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Related: 5 Tricks for Getting into the Writing Zone

3. Cut out distractions.

Start by closing your Internet browser and turning off notifications on your phone or mobile device while you write. Those little pings and notifications can distract you, and writing requires deep focus. It's worth disconnecting, my friend! If you want to take this a step further, try removing all social media apps from your device.

4. Consume less.

Skip the television or movies, and be choosy about what you read. You don't have to do this all the time, but when you're struggling to focus or need to meet a deadline, skipping the entertainment will give you more time to write.

You might also find that it helps you think more deeply about your stories. Last month I cut out most of the entertainment I was consuming, and simply reducing made me feel far less distracted. I had more energy and ideas for my stories, and as a bonus the extra time helped me get more done.

5. Create incentive.

Even during short writing sessions, having a set goal can be a powerful incentive. Whether you want to write 100 words or 2,000 words, that goal can motivate you to write, and meeting it will give you positive reinforcement.

Even during short writing sessions, having a set goal can be a powerful incentive.

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Incentive doesn't have to be anything complicated. What works for me is to have a special mark or sticker I can add to my calendar if I earn it. Last month I was revising, so I "earned" a highlighter mark on my calendar if I made significant progress. It doesn't sound like much, but it did help motivate me. I loved earning those little tic marks!

Related: 5 Tips for Setting Reasonable Writing Goals and Making Them Happen

6. Track your time.

Track the time you spend doing writing-related activities, including social media. Even if you can only do it for a week or a month, the exercise of tracking your time will give you valuable insights. Why? It's hard to know how to make better use of your time when you're not sure how you're spending it. How much time are you really spending on Twitter and Facebook? How much time are you actively writing? Sometimes seeing the stark reality ("I spent how much time on Twitter?!") can be all the incentive you need to make some changes.

Part of why I deleted the social media apps on my mobile device in January was to make sure I tracked the time I spent using them. The side benefit was that I realized just how of a time suck social media can be for me. That time adds up, and it's precious!

7. Work in batches.

Group tasks into batches and work on them for blocks of time instead of multitasking. It will help you focus, and you will very likely be far more productive. Even if you're not sure - try it! You might be surprised.

Group tasks into batches and work on them for blocks of time instead of multitasking.

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Since I wanted to gain accurate information about exactly how my time was spent, I used Toggl (a free time-tracking app) and divided my work into different categories (i.e. blogging, writing, social media). As soon as I started the timer, I only worked on one task. Suddenly, I realized it was easier to focus, and I was getting exponentially more done than I usually do.

Tip: Have a notebook on hand in your workspace. It comes in handy when you're working in batches, because you can jot down those, "Oops, I forgot to ..." items or ideas without distracting you from your current task.

8. Know when to quit.

There are times when focusing on writing or on the task on hand just won't happen. The sooner you can stop and move to a new task (or stop working entirely), the better. Not only will it help you avoid burnout, but it will also give you a chance to break out of the rut and hopefully give your mind a break.

If you can, leave your workspace. Your brain is telling you to take a break, so use the time to move around, go outside, or do something away from the computer. Breaks like this can you relax, and might also give your mind the space it needs to overcome blocks and fill in those pesky plot holes.

9. Schedule when possible.

Schedule social media and blog posts in advance, and -- if you are checking in on social media -- schedule set times for being online. Give yourself 30 minutes a day, for example, to tweet, post on Facebook, share Instagram photos. Although you might not stick to this forever, try it for at least a week. You might be surprised how much time you can free up by limiting your social media -- without hurting your online platform.

Tip: I use BoardBooster to schedule pins, and it's helped me free up SO much time while still giving me a way to build my presence on Pinterest (which brings me most of my traffic). Use my BoardBooster referral link, and you can try it for free -- you get 100+ pins to start and it gives you more than enough time to see if the app is a good fit for you. Try BoardBooster free!

I share exactly how I schedule blog posts and use social media in my free Build a Better Blog Challenge for writers. Click the image below to join!

Build a better blog in 2016: A community-building challenge for writers and bloggers who want to up their blogging game. A FREE workbook, seven-lesson course, and online workshop replay, plus support to help you focus your blogging goals and create a content plan for 2016. Click through to join and sign up to get your FREE workbook!

I hope these tips help you free up more time and increase your productivity. If you found this post valuable, I would appreciate it if you used the links below to share it!

Now it's your turn: Do you have productivity tips to share?


Before we talk about specific blog post topic ideas, we're going to delve into the why behind your blog posts. This is an important first step; once you define your why, you won't have any lack of blog post ideas!

5 engaging blog post ideas for writers and authors plus the essential step to take before you start brainstorming or blogging. Take this post to the next level by joining the FREE Build a Better Blog Challenge for writers! Read the post to get started >>>

Time and again I see similar questions from writers who want to blog. Questions like:

  • Why would anyone want read my blog?

  • What's so special about me (and what I blog about) that will make people want to read?

  • There are so many blogs out there, what's different about what I want to blog about?

Here's the thing, my friends.

All of these questions aren't the right question.

Why? Because these questions are focused on you, the writer, and not your readers.

The biggest shift I made in blogging - the shift that helped me grow my audience and start to see a real change in traffic - happened when I stopped asking "What can I write about?" and started asking "What do my readers what to read about?"

Define your purpose

So before we dive into topic ideas, I encourage you to take five minutes (or more!) to jot down the reason why you want to blog, who you want to reach through your blog, and how you can best reach or serve your ideal readers.

Want to take this to the next level? I include worksheets and in-depth exercises in my Build a Better Blog Challenge. Click the image below to get started!

Build a better blog in 2016: A community-building challenge for writers and bloggers who want to up their blogging game. A FREE workbook, seven-lesson course, and online workshop replay, plus support to help you focus your blogging goals and create a content plan for 2016. Click through to join and sign up to get your FREE workbook!

Here are a few questions you can use to help you focus:

  • What do you want to achieve through your blog?

  • Who do you want to reach?

  • What do your readers want to learn, discover, or create?

  • How can you help them?

  • What value can you give your readers?

Here's the best part: By taking the time to define your purpose and really delve into your whys behind blogging, you will have far less trouble coming up with blog post ideas. Promise! (In fact, you might have more post ideas than you have time to write new posts...but that's a problem for another blog post!)

Take the time to define your purpose, and you'll have far less trouble coming up with blog post ideas.

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Now that you've defined your purpose, let's dive into coming up with topic ideas for your blog. These are broad topics you can use to help you focus and come up with specific blog post ideas that are relevant and valuable to your audience. If you want specific post ideas, check out my 50 Blog Post Ideas for Writers.

Remember: Use your answers to the above questions to help you hone in on ideas that fit your goals and the desires or needs of your audience. Reference them when brainstorming topics to make sure you're on the right track. With each blog post, think about how you can tie it back to your main purpose, and how you can make sure to give value to your readers.

Teach

People love to learn new things. With your ideal reader in mind, find out where they spend time online, then listen. What do they want to learn? Are they struggling with a certain tool, technique, or problem? Think deeply about how you could help. Not sure where to start? Ask a good friend or family member about what they think you do well, or what they would love to learn from you. Do you take amazing photos? Are you great at organizing your workspace? Have you been asked for advice or help with a certain topic or in using a tool? Start there!

How-to posts and DIYs are great examples. Things like: How to Organize Your Bookshelf by Color, How to Create a Bookstagram-Worthy Photo, DIY Your Own Bookshelves, DIY Writing Progress Calendar.

Psst: Want more specific blog post ideas? Check out my 50 Blog Post Ideas for Writers!

Inspire

If you've been on Pinterest or Instagram, then you're already aware of how much people love inspiring quotes. This also applies to blogs! You can start with sharing inspiring quotes (and perhaps include a note about how you have found the quote useful, relevant, or inspiring). Or would your readers be inspired by an interview with another writer or author? Again, do your homework: find your readers online, and figure out what they find inspiring -- or what type of inspiration they're missing that you can to provide.

Find your readers online & figure out what type of inspiration they're missing that you can provide.

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Entertain

One of my favorite romance authors uses her blog to share funny stories. Her books are romantic comedies, so the stories are a great fit for her audience. They get to learn more about the author, and they also get more of what they've learned to expect from her (funny stories about family and relationships).

Think about what your audience would find entertaining. Would they like links to scary movie trailers? Or silly videos of you talking about writing? Perhaps fun facts or historical trivia related to your book research? Different audiences will find different things entertaining, but you can always test a new type of content out and scrap it if the response isn't strong enough.

Curate

One of the things people look for are content curators. For example, I love Dahlia Adler's book round ups. Since she's created a number of great round ups that I've successfully used to find new books, I know from experience that her recommendations are on point for me.

I also like to go to author blogs or join their mailing lists in the hopes of finding their book recommendations. My thinking is that if I love the author, then I'm likely to love the books they recommend.

Both of these examples are about book recommendations, but your content curation doesn't have to be limited to books. Do you tend to share writing-related links with friends? Are you periodically sharing inspiring Instagram accounts? Or perhaps you're great at finding cute notebooks or products your audience on your blog. All of these are excellent blog post opportunities.

Share

Whenever possible, you want to build relationships with your readers. How? You can start by sharing posts that give your readers some insight into your life. There's no need to share every little detail of your life (share as much or as little as you wish). The most important thing is to focus on sharing aspects of your life your readers will find relevant and valuable. Give them ways to connect with you, help them get to know you, but keep your purpose in mind.

Focus on sharing aspects of your life your readers will find relevant and valuable.

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For example, thriller writers might not share details of their relationships (unless they're thrilling?), whereas it would be far more relevant for a romance writer to include at least some insight into their own relationships.


Truly, you are only limited by your imagination when it comes to blog post ideas. It can be overwhelming to start, but once you stop and think deeply about who you're writing for and what they want or need, you'll have no trouble coming up with great content.

If you want more help and guidance in getting strategic with your blog, take a look at my FREE Build a Better Blog Challenge. Click the image below to get started!

Build a better blog in 2016: A community-building challenge for writers and bloggers who want to up their blogging game. A FREE workbook, seven-lesson course, and online workshop replay, plus support to help you focus your blogging goals and create a content plan for 2016. Click through to join and sign up to get your FREE workbook!

It's your turn, friend! I would love to hear your thoughts: Which of these topics do you cover on your blog right now, and which would you like to add?


Does anyone else use the month of February as an excuse to read more romance novels? If so, then this post is for you. I've pulled together 16 of my absolute favorite recent favorite romance reads, and I've included fantasy, contemporary, Young Adult, New Adult, Regency romance, and more. Take a look, and share the titles you'd add in the comments!

Romances are as different as romance readers. Sometimes you want a gentle, heart-warming story, and other times you want something that's blush-inducingly steamy. To help you pick the perfect romantic read for the perfect moment, I've ordered my 16 Romantic Reads for Valentine's Day from heart-warming to blush-inducing.

The books at the beginning of the list will give you warm-fuzzies and those romantic moments you're craving, and by the end of the list you may want to invest in a nice fan or at least a chilled glass of wine. In other words, maybe don't read the books at the end of the list in public, because when I say blush-inducing, I mean it !. ;)

Psst: You can skip straight to the list I made on Goodreads for links to each book's info and buying options.

Does anyone else use the month of February as an excuse to read more romance novels? If so, then this post was written specially for you. I've pulled together 16 of my absolute favorite recent favorite romance reads for you. Click through to see which books made the list! >>>

1. THE APPLE ORCHARD by Susan Wiggs

Full of complex family histories and dynamics, long-kept secrets, plus a slow-build romance - great if you're looking for a satisfying romantic read.

2. TO ALL THE BOYS I LOVED BEFORE by Jenny Han

What is it about this book that makes me want to stay in the main character's world forever? Definitely on the sweet and heart-warming end of the romance spectrum. Perfect if you love contemporary YA and slow, sweet romance.

3. CATCHING JORDAN by Miranda Keneally

The main character in CATCHING JORDAN plays football, and that's just the start of her uniqueness. I loved reading her story - the romance isn't the number one focus, but it's a sweet and heart-warming read.

4. THE VINTAGE GUIDE TO LOVE AND ROMANCE by Kristy Greenwood

This book is: Hilarious. Laugh-out-loud funny. Sweet. Add just a dash of romance and you have it. The Vintage Guide to Love and Romance is UK chick lit, and perhaps the best-written chick lit I've ever read.

5. THE BEST MAN by Kristan Higgins

Kristan Higgins' books are consistently funny and touching, and always include a good dose of swoon. Family and community often play a role in her novels, and THE BEST MAN is no different. It's the start of the Blue Heron series - about a family-run winery in upstate New York. This book is such a perfect read when you want to have all the feels and be left with a happy ending.

6. HEROES ARE MY WEAKNESS by Susan Elizabeth Philips

Like in many of Susan Elizabeth Philips' novels, Heroes Are My Weakness opens with a quirky and memorable scene. I won't ruin it for you, but it was the absolute last thing I expected. The book is an ode to Victorian Gothic Novels, with unique twists to keep things interesting. A very fun and unexpectedly unique romance, with a satisfying path to a great ending.

Bookmarking this list of 16 Romantic Reads for Valentine's Day!

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7. NEANDERTHAL SEEKS HUMAN by Penny Reid

The sweet and smart heroine might be the entire reason why this book is on the list. That and the chemistry between her and the hero.

8. ONE GOOD EARL DESERVES A LOVER by Sarah MacLean

This is book number two in a series and the entire series is so. much. fun. The main characters in this had great chemistry, and I loved the nerdy and logical female protagonist.

9. SOMETHING LIKE NORMAL by Trish Doller

Something Like Normal is NA romance at it's best. It's a captivating, heart-wrenching story. Beautifully written and powerful.

10. MY BEAUTIFUL ENEMY by Sherry Thomas

Sherry Thomas has a number of romance novels that I love - she often writes heroines that stand out from other Victorian romances (they have jobs, or aren't in the upperclass, etc.). In My Beautiful Enemy, the main character is biracial and skilled in the martial arts. She's kick ass. The story is rich, full of interesting history and unique twists - a very satisfying read.

11. DARK TRIUMPH by Robin LaFevers

I love the His Fair Assassin series and would have added all of them ... but if I had to pick my favorite, it would be Dark Triumph. The main characters have dark, dark pasts, and seeing their story unfold kept me reading late into the night. I love Robin LaFevers rich, detailed writing style, and the dark, paranormal medieval setting is amazing. (I recommend starting with book number one in the series if you can.) :)

12. SCREWDRIVERED by Alice Clayton

THIS BOOK! Hands-down one of my all-time favorite romances. I don't want to ruin it for you, but please read this book if you like spunky/quirky female protagonists, laugh-out-loud jokes, and slow burn romances.

13. AFTER THE KISS by Lauren Layne

An opposites-attract romance with oodles of steamy scenes, fireworks, and the set up of a series of contemporary romances. Fun!

14. LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT by Dahlia Adler

I had a hard time choosing which of Dahlia's books to include on this list, but picked LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT because it does such a fantastic job with a tough story. The main character loses her parents and gains custody of her younger siblings. She goes from college party girl to guardian, and the transition isn't easy. Meanwhile, she develops feelings for her TA (uh oh). Definitely heart-wrenching, but also just a lovely read.

15. MORE THAN COMICS by Elizabeth Briggs

I talk about Elizabeth Briggs' Chasing the Dream series A LOT because it's really, really good. Fantastic writing with tension-packed plots and Steamy (capital S) romance. This book is a favorite because of the ComicCon setting, the writer heroine, and the artistic + grumpy hero.

16. TALK ME DOWN by Victoria Dahl

Victoria Dahl's books are great fun. She doesn't hold back in her romances (you've been warned!), but I love her smart and snappy dialogue, unique spins on stories, and the kind of heroines I'd like to have a glass of wine with. TALK ME DOWN is no different. Definitely a favorite!


See the full list with more info and book buying options on Goodreads!

That's my list! I'm always looking for new books, so let me know if you have recommendations. You can also vote for books to add to my Romantic Reads for Valentine's Day 2016 list on Goodreads.

It's your turn, friend. Have you read anything great lately? (Romance or not?) I'd love to hear about it!